Sunday, September 7, 2014

Math Daily 3, How We Started

When the second edition of The Daily 5 came out earlier this year I was thrilled to see the authors included a chapter about math.  The ideas in the first edition of The Daily 5 really changed my classroom for the better by helping me create independence with my young learners, which allowed me to more easily work with small groups and individuals.
A few years ago I tried to implement the Math Daily 5 that was outlined on the authors' website (thedailycafe.com).  At that point there were five components to their math block.  I found that I did not have enough time to get to all five activities each day.  So, that year I toned it down a little and did my version, which by coincidence was three parts (math by myself, math with a partner, and math with the teacher).  We stuck with that structure for the rest of the year, but I didn't love it enough to continue on that same path the next year.
Fast forward three or four years and finally, Chapter 8 of the second edition of The Daily 5 is published.  Hello Math Daily 3!  
Math Daily 3 includes:  Math by Myself, Math with Someone, and Math Writing.  

Of the three elements, Math Writing was the one I was most concerned about implementing with my first graders.  After a lot of thought and some research, (checking out what other bloggers are doing with their Math Writing) I decided to use a couple of resources that are ready to print and go.  No point in reinventing the wheel, right?
I took advantage of Jennifer Whites' Math Question of the Day Pack and Reagan Tunstall's Math Journals, to get my students started with the Math Writing portion of Math Daily 3.  Both of these packets have printable pages that students can glue into their math journals and then write their responses.
We spent a good couple of weeks doing Math Writing together as a class.  I wanted my students to understand the quality of responses I expect to see. 


My main concern with Math Writing was (and is) that students will complete it much sooner than the other activities going on during the Math Daily 3 rotations.  So I'm working on some early finisher tasks.  I plan to use math centers (that do not require recording sheets), simple games, and puzzles.  Of course, students may not need additional activities during their Math Writing time, but it doesn't hurt to have them ready just in case.


Math By Myself, in my class is a time for students to work on their math assignments independently and a time to meet with the teacher.  I meet with a leveled group of students and we do some work on the day's skill.  We use might use white boards, counters, activities mats, and so on.  After we complete our hands on activity, I'll give instructions and answer questions about that day's written assignment.  Students will return to their desks to complete their assignment, I will be available to them if they need my help.
For example, this week we worked on Touch Math addition.  During their time with me students used white boards to practice drawing the dots and circles on the touch numbers.  They also practiced writing touch math addition equations and solving them.  After our meeting students completed their assignments independently.


While Math by Myself may not be totally "by myself," it does give students some time to work on their own and it gives me some time to level instruction for the diverse needs in my classroom.


For Math with Someone I am mainly using math centers.  Most of these centers are review and some of them lay the groundwork for upcoming concepts.  
Each day students choose a partner and then a center they would like to complete.  In the past I assigned partners and setup a schedule for our math and literacy centers.  However, after reading about a simple idea to keep track of math center completions, I knew I had to try giving students a little more autonomy.


Here's how it works . . . I printed a list of student names for each center and then laminated them.  When students complete the center, they mark their names off the list.  Love it!  It's less on me and the students actually get to have some choice.   (Thanks for such a great idea Cara Carroll.)
The centers we use during Math with Someone include center pieces and recording sheets.  Each student is responsible for completing a recording sheet.  If students finish their center before the rotation time is up, they mix their cards up and match them again.


Student usually love Math with Someone.  They get an opportunity to work away from their seats and to work with a partner.  I love math centers for because they provide that constant review students need to stay on top of math skills.
For a free copy of the math center in the picture, click on the picture below.  Ten Frame Apples on Top is a ten frame/equation matching center inspired by the book Ten Apples Up on Top.  It is from my September Smarties {10 Math Centers} packet.


If you are looking for more activities like this one, click on the picture below.  I have bundled all eleven sets of monthly math centers together for a go-to Math with Someone resource



Math Writing, Math by Myself, and Math with Someone is the rotation portion of Math Daily 3.  I've not even mentioned the mini lessons.  The mini lessons are also very important to your math time.  Mini lessons are your whole group instruction time.  The lessons should be kept very brief, ten minutes at the most.
Mini lesson content is not laid out the second edition of The Daily 5.  The curriculum is up to you.  Math Daily 3 gives you a basic structure for your math time, it does not determine what you teach.
Below is my basic schedule for Math Daily 3.  The rotations are 15 minutes each and the mini lessons are ten minutes or less.  I am flexible with the last mini lesson.  I like to go over our Math Writing during this final mini lesson.  But, if we are short on time, that lesson can be omitted.


Although I am not following the book to a tee, so far Math Daily 3 has been working well in my classroom.  There are so many resources out there that have made it fairly easy to implement.  I'm sure I'll have some new insights and ideas about it as we progress through the year.  But, for now things are up and going, so I'm pretty happy.

41 comments:

  1. I enjoyed reading this and, as always I'm so impressed with your organization. We have to do a very scripted math program with year but i can see that this would be my preference. Your math center packets look wonderful and I think you need to whip up some for kinder in your spare time! :)

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  2. I am trying to find a new way to teach my math lessons and came upon math daily 3 and this post. Thank you so much for explaining it so well! This really helped me understand how to works and now I'm excited to start it in my own classroom!

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  3. This is thrilling, Are you required to use a math series? I have been trying to differentiate math for years.

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    1. We use a math series. But I must admit I bring in a lot of my own materials. The curriculum you use with Math Daily 3 doesn't make it or break it.
      Best of luck.
      Amber

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  4. Thanks for the ideas, sounds really good. In NZ we are about to begin the year and I will be using some of your ideas. Thank you for sharing and taking the time to explain how it all works. Rachel.

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  5. I have been looking for resources on Math Daily 3. I've always been struggling with differentiation and scaffolding in Math. This is a great structure to follow. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Good luck with your journey finding your favorite math structure.
      Thanks for stopping by.

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  6. Can you tell me the breakdown of time spent on mini lessons and rotation times? This looks like a great model for me to use in my classroom.

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    1. The rotation times are generally 15 minutes (give or take). I usually spend a little more time with struggling students and a little less time with uppers. Since I have young students with short attention spans, the whole group mini lessons range from 10-15 minutes.
      Some days we do not have time to all the Daily 3 math structure. But, it works well when we have the time.
      Thanks for stopping by.

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    2. This has been so helpful to get my head around Daily 3, however time is very limited, so what happens when you don't get all the Daily 3 structure finished?
      Thanks,
      Chloe

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  7. I teach 4th grade and would love to do something like this for math! Do you have any recommendations on resources or sources for this grade?

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    1. I wish I could help. I do not know about upper grade ready made resources for this type of structure. I'm sure they are out there.
      I do recommend reading the new edition of The Daily 5, you might find some inspiration.
      Thanks for stopping by.

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  8. I absolutely love your blog! Thank you so much for taking the time to share your wonderful ideas as to make other's lives easier! I have a deep appreciation for those that can be mommys, teachers, creators of wonderful items, and bloggers in their spare time. It is greatly appreciated!
    Question (which probably has been asked and answered, sorry if so): Do you have an editable version for you Math with Someone center labels? I absolutely love the clipart and realize that this would be customized to your class names, but would love these to set up my centers this way for my Math with Someone. (I am known to be the one with the "cutesy" things and I am now realizing that it is all about presentation and eye appeal for the kiddos that makes me lean towards cutesy!)
    Thank you!!

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    1. Hi.
      I've finally created editable center cards. Check this post-http://www.schoolisahappyplace.blogspot.com/2015/01/classroom-organization-blog-hop.html
      Thanks for stopping by.

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    2. Thank you for sharing. I am excited to start making Math Centers ASAP!

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  9. Thank you for sharing. My question for implementation is how long do you give the students to complete the 10 partner activities? A week? Two weeks? The whole month? I would love to use your ideas and practices!

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    1. Hi Heather.
      Sorry for the delayed response.
      I try to work through the 10 centers in about a month. Some days we do not have time to get to them and some centers we do twice. Of course there are lots of ways to break it down. It really depends on your students.
      Thanks for stopping by.
      Amber

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  11. I love this ideas. I have one worry, though. How do your kids do on the guided practice when you have a rotation between whole group instruction and guided practice? I'd be worried some kids would lose/forget some concepts if they didn't move into it right after whole group. How has that gone for you?

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  13. I just found your blog today as I was searching for Math Daily 3. I LOVE your ideas. Currently I have technology in my math rotation. Do you have technology in your Math Daily 3 rotations? If so, where and how? Thanks so much!

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    1. Hi Tammie.
      Sorry for the delay. I use technology (mainly math apps on an iPad) during math with someone. Technically when students use the iPad they are working independently, but the technology is a great to mix in with the center work.
      As far as how much, I would say the iPads or computer math activities would be 10%-20% of the math with someone. The rest would be partner centers/games.
      Thanks for stopping by.
      Amber

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  14. Thanks for the post! Your innovational ideas are really different and helpful. At our Phoenix pre-k I would love to use your ideas. Do you have any recommendations for resources used in these classes?

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  15. Do you get unlimited copies? I only get 2000 a month, so I'm worried about printing so many pages for centers. I don't know how else to keep my students accountable though.

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    1. Hi Kayla.
      I'm limited with paper, not copies. What I use beyond my allotment is on me. So, in a way I am limited. I am mindful of how I use my copies. In my opinion, the recording sheets are worth the copies, (like you said) for accountability.
      Students can complete centers without the recording sheet. One idea is to have students take a picture (assuming you have an iPad in your class) of their completed center. You can check their work from the picture.
      I'm sure you will figure out something. Teachers are resourceful.
      Have a great year.
      Amber

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  16. Just wondered whete you got your clipart to make your math tub number signs? Do you sell these?

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  17. This is certainly been so important.

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  20. Invaluable comments . I was enlightened by the points ! Does anyone know where I could possibly access a fillable Smart Recovery Meeting Attendance Verification document to use ?

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    1. Hello Elie Uuu. my assistant obtained a sample PA CY 113 (UF) example here http://pdf.ac/25bxEo

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  21. Do you have this for reading, grade 3??

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    1. Check out The Daily 5 Book. It's a short read and can tell you all about how it works for reading. I'm sure it will work in 3rd grade.
      Thanks for stopping by.

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  22. Hi, do you have a bundle that includes all of the yearly math centers on TPT??

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    1. My math centers are available at TPT. They are not bundled. There are 11 sets of them.
      Thanks for the question.

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  23. Do you have a separate time for science and have you tried this in the science setting or do you address science in a different manner?
    Thanks

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    1. Hi.
      Most of our science and social studies is integrated into our literacy and math time. Sometimes we have extended time for these subjects, but math and literacy is our main priority.
      I haven't tried this type of set up in science. I'm sure you could make it work, if you had enough time.
      Thanks for your question.

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  24. Do you have the format for you center name checklist?

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  25. What do you do when a partner isn't available? Like they already did that center?

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